Interviewed by Victoria Fedorets on September 21st, 2017

Sevtap is currently an Assistant Professor at Prince George’s Community College’s Language Studies Department. She holds an MA in Curriculum and Instruction with an ESL specialty from George Washington University. She is a Swiss born Turkish-American citizen who has had the opportunity to teach students from various social-cultural backgrounds.

VF: Sevtap, thank you for stopping by VIU today to introduce our students to [WATESOL’s] NNEST caucus and to answer some questions for us. Tell us a little bit why you are here today.
SF: Thank you again. My name is Sevtap Frantz, and I currently teach as an assistant professor at Prince George’s Community College as a full-time faculty member. Prior to that, I have worked as an adjunct faculty member in different institutions, such as George Washington University, Georgetown, and Northern Virginia Community College. I’m here today on behalf of the NNEST Caucus which is comprised of dedicated native and non-native speaking teachers.

Today I would like to talk about the Caucus and encourage the pre-service teachers, your graduate students, to become part of this group so they can feel empowered and encouraged in order to be well-informed about what to expect in the field.

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Join us for our next Voices from the Field Speaker Series!

Our guest speaker, Joy Peyton from the Center for Applied Linguistics will give a talk on Practicing Nonviolent Communication: Speaking the language of peace.

An audio preview of the talk is available here: https://goo.gl/hqYrFY

A brief abstract is below:

Many of us are interested in and strive for peaceful engagement in our families, communities, schools, and nation, and there are strong calls for peace within our education community (e.g., Oxford, 2013; The Language of Peace: Communicating to Create Harmony) and in international engagement initiatives (e.g., Gopin, 2016; Healing the Heart of Conflict). However, understandings about ways to live in peace often remain abstract, and the language that we observe in politics, the media, and even in education (and that we use ourselves) is often filled with judgments, labels, and blame, and we increasingly see misunderstandings and division across, and even within, the groups that we care about and engage with. The goals of this talk are to review key principles and components of nonviolent communication, which teachers can use with learners and colleagues and in their classes, and all of us can use in our daily lives. These include ways to Observe, express our own Feelings, understand our Needs, and make Requests.

Join us on November 2, 2017 from 3:30-4:30 on campus at VIU (4401 Village Drive, Fairfax, VA 22030) in VD-205.

Voices from the Field events are FREE and open to the public! To register, visit our page here: http://www.viu.edu/sed/prospective-students-3/voices-from-the-field/vff-2017-2018.html

Questions? Contact Kevin Martin (Associate Dean, School of Education) at kevin@viu.edu, follow us on social media @SEDatVIU and @TESOLVIU, on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/SEDatVIU, and visit the School of Education’s website at http://www.viu.edu/sed!

The organizers of CLLC 2018 are now accepting submissions for the 2018 Conference on Language, Learning, and Culture!

Making Research Matter: Motivated Inquiry for Actionable Insights

  • Proposal Submission Deadline: December 4, 2017
  • Conference Dates:April 6-7, 2018m
  • Location: Village Drive Room 101, 4401 Village Drive, Fairfax, VA 22030

Call for Proposals and Guidelines: http://conference.viu.edu/cllc/content/call-for-proposals

Registration: http://conference.viu.edu/cllc/content/registration

In focusing on “Making Research Matter,” CLLC 2018 seeks to stimulate conversations on how research and its uses in society might be transformed if more of us were to make a point of asking “for what, for whom, and by whom?”* at the outset of every research endeavor.

Our aim is to involve a diverse group of practitioners, researchers, policy-makers, community members, and other stakeholders in a multidirectional sharing of interests, values, and expertise. We especially welcome proposals involving projects in which the investigators considered the users and uses of their research from the very beginning and made decisions accordingly—from action-research projects conducted by individual teachers in their classrooms to larger-scale funded endeavors where collaborative teams had an eye toward wider public engagement and policy impacts, and everything in between.

Proposals for paper and poster presentations, workshops, colloquia, and panel discussions are invited until December 4, 2017.

We hope to see you for our 5th annual CLLC!

*Ortega, L. (2005). For what and for whom is our research? The ethical as transformative lens in instructed SLA. Modern Language Journal, 89, 427–43.

Listen to our interview here: https://goo.gl/hqYrFY

A transcript of the talk is below.

Victoria Fedorets (VF): Hello, Dr. Peyton, Thank you for joining us today. We are very excited to welcome you here at our school, and we appreciate your time and involvement in our Voices from the Field and for spending some time with us away from your busy schedule.

Joy Kreeft Peyton (JP): Thank you for having me. I am very excited to be with you.

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by Victoria Fedorets 

In 1907, the following text appeared in Edwin C Woolley’s (1907) Handbook of Composition: A Compendium of Rules Regarding Good English, Grammar, Sentence Structure, Paragraphing, Manuscript Arrangement, Punctuation, Spelling, Essay Writing, and Letter Writing. This handbook was intended to provide guidelines for students to refer to while writing, and for teachers to correct the writing of their students. The handbook included a series of independent rules that were either followed or broken.

The handbook was an active effort to shift from the traditional grammar books of the time that focused on the parts of speech, clause modifiers, etc., to include 350 rules governing writing in the English language and style.

Below are some examples from the book (p. 4):

  1. The contractions don’t, isn’t, haven’t, etc. are not appropriate in formal composition. They are proper in conversation and in composition of a colloquial style that structured descriptive.
  2. Do not use high flow language for plain things.

Bad:  To keep the horsehealthy you must be careful of his environment.

Right: To keep the horse healthy you must be careful of his stable.

Note. Showy language, like showy dress, is in bad taste. The essence of artistic language, as of everything artistic, is not abundant ornament but appropriateness. Straining for high sounding expressions to replace plain English makes a style weak and crude. Call a leg a leg not a limb, book a book not an effort, call a letter a letter not a kind favor, call socks socks not hose, call a house a house, not a residence; say “I went to bed”, not “I retired”, “I got up”, not “I arose”

  1. The use of sentence (except a quoted sentence) as the subject of IS or WAS is crudity.

Crude: I was detained by business is the reason I’m late.

Right: “I was detained by business; that is the reason I’m late.”

  1. Double negative ( i.e., the use in sentence, of two or more negative words not coordinate, -as “I couldn’t find it nowhere”) is forbidden by modern usage..
  2. A composition should treat a single subject and should treat it throughout according to a self- consistent method.
  3. Use to the question mark after the direct question, but not after an indirect question.

Bad: He asked what caused the accident?

Right: He asked what caused the accident.

Right: He asked, “What caused the accident?”

  1. Italicize name of ships.
  2. The postage stamp should be attached in the upper right-hand corner. It should be right side up and its edges should be parallel to edges of the envelope. A postage stamp upside down or affixed in a haphazard fashion raises against the sender of the letter a suspicion of slovenliness.

Writing teachers today would be right at home with Wooley’s grammar. His rules were followed by various handbooks for a while- an immense range of rules to be referred to in order to distinguish the possible errors. His method was different from other writers, like Murray’s (22 rules to be learned by heart); however, Wooley’s 354 grammar rules were memorized and to be used for reference. As opposed to other writing/style guides of the time, rhetorical and spoken language was never mentioned.

Reinking, McKeena Labbo, & Keifer (1998) in their Handbook of Literacy and Technology: Transformations in A Post-Typographic World (p.14), refer to a post-typographic world as a time after the printers, typewriters, laser printers and fax machines. That post-typographic time is upon us as we are in the paperless age of television, IPods, Ipads, Tweets, TMS (text messaging services), internet sites, and apps. How do we, as educators, hold students accountable for knowing grammar and writing rules in order to teach literacy? Modern literacy is being merged with media literacy, where the ability to write (i.e., the ability to synthesize ideas and elements to create new text per the core competencies of the public schools) means being media literate. This media literacy is now a necessity for students and teachers alike, as it exists in and out of the classroom.

Referring to Wooley’s (1907) rules, does the metacognitive ability in children provide them with the set of “instruments” to follow the rules of writing as an innate ability while being exposed to the digital and media era? Can—and should— we trace children’s ability of learning a rule as they master their mother tongue? How about the cognate ability of the ESL/EFL speaker? Or that of the L2 and L1 bilingual child raised in the US? Do we have to refer to the “media” rules while educating the individuals K-12 and what are they?

 

References
Reinking, D., McKenna, M. C., Labbo, L. D., & Kieffer, R. D. (1998). Handbook of Literacy and Technology: Transformations in A Post-typographic World. New York, NY: Routledge.

Woolley, E. C., PhD. (1907). Handbook of Composition: A Compendium of Rules Regarding Good English, Grammar, Sentence Structure, Paragraphing, Manuscript Arrangement, Punctuation, Spelling, Essay Writing, and Letter Writing. Lexington, MNA: DC Heath & Company