Congratulations! You recently graduated from college and have often wondered how your life should proceed here on. Of the many subject areas you studied and excelled in, you remain curious about what it takes to work in projects, rather! So strong is your curiosity that you visited two construction projects in your city to observe how work is ordered and performed.  

While in school you wrote summary notes from every project management course you took, enough to last a lifetime. The issue now is not just finding a job, but to find a job in an area of specialty on which you can build a career. By observing work operations at these sites, you imagined yourself with a yellow hat on your head, about fifty or so people are busy in so many ways around you – every one of them focused at the task before them with a sense of urgency. Yes, you remembered that every task in an activity has a defined duration and must be completed so that the successor activity can start or finish. 

Truth be told, project operations or work are performed in so many different formats and in different places. There are those projects that produce physical structures, such as a highway, an airport, library, and a Boeing 727. Other project works produce outcomes such as a software or application package that support business operations. Yet, information technology (IT) service projects deliver infrastructural, technical and process changes to a business environment by the implementation of more efficient operational and procedural best practice solutions. 

The prospects for a career in managing projects is endless, but is it for you? 

You must know more about yourself before you take the plunge. Have you ever completed a personality assessment to understand the real you – your likes, dislikes, and temperament, but much more, your emotional quotient? While you continue to look for an entry-level job in managing projects, please submit to an online free personality assessment tool. Try two types and compare what they say about you. No matter the result, you could still be a highly successful project manager if and when you understand and find that balance between you (the real you), and others in your work space.